Couple Claims IV Solution Error Led to Baby’s Death

When an error is made regarding a medication or IV solution that is given to an infant, it can have major consequences. In some circumstances, this type of error can even lead to an infant’s death. Thus, it is extremely important for hospitals and their staff to do everything they reasonably can to avoid this kind of medication error.

Recently, a medical malpractice case has arisen involving an IV solution that was given to an infant. The case involves a baby boy who was born prematurely and who received care from a hospital in Illinois. During this care, a doctor reportedly ordered that the baby be given an IV solution.

The baby’s parents claim that the IV solution a pharmacy technician provided to fulfill this order was incorrect. They allege that the solution the technician provided contained many times more sodium than the solution the doctor had prescribed.

Allegedly, the IV bag which contained this solution was initially correctly labeled to indicate this high sodium content. However, the baby’s parents claim that the IV bag had been relabeled by the time a nurse administered the solution to the baby and that this new label incorrectly indicated that the bag contained the proper solution. The baby died after being given this solution.

The baby’s parents have now brought a medical malpractice lawsuit against the hospital. They allege that negligence by the hospital and its staff caused the above-mentioned error and that this error caused their child’s death.

As the allegations in this case illustrate, it is very important for medical professions to not commit negligent errors in connection to medications or IV solutions that are administered to infants. These errors can cause great harm to infants. Consequently, one hopes that all hospitals will make sure to have procedures in place aimed at preventing these types of errors.

Source: The Chicago Sun-Times, “Lawsuit says Park Ridge hospital’s negligence caused baby’s death,” Kim Janssen, 6 April 2011