Educating Connecticut Residents About Childhood Cancer

On average, 43 children each day are diagnosed with cancer, which is a disease involving abnormal cell growth. It impacts children of all ages, races and economic backgrounds, which is why September 2016 was labeled Childhood Cancer Awareness Month. The goal is to educate people about the causes and impact of cancer on both those who are diagnosed as well as those tasked with caring for them.

It also aims to raise money to help fight a wide variety of childhood cancers. This is important because many research facilities lack the funds needed to continue doing research that may improve patient outcomes. Creating a month dedicated to cancer awareness also allows survivors or those who have diagnosed a chance to connect with others going through similar situations. Fighting the battle is generally easier when there is a support network to lean on.

Talking about childhood cancer also allows more insight into how often cases of cancer are misdiagnosed. According to research done at Johns Hopkins University, one case out of 71 will be misdiagnosed while one in five cases will be incorrectly classified. Therefore, children and their families may go through an emotional experience for no reason. Children who receive treatment for a misdiagnosed illness may also suffer physical harm.

A cancer misdiagnosis in a child may expose that patient to unnecessary emotional and physical trauma. It may cause parents to take time off of work or accrue medical bills unnecessarily, and it could also result in a worsening of the actual medical condition that the child has. Parents who have been affected in this manner may want to meet with a medical malpractice attorney for advice on how best to seek compensation of the losses that have resulted from the error.