How Does Preeclampsia Affect an Unborn Child?

In a blog post last week, we talked to our readers about preeclampsia — the pregnancy-related condition that can result in a number of other serious health conditions if it isn’t diagnosed earlier and treated just as quickly. This week, we wanted to continue our discussion about this potentially fatal condition by explaining the negative impact it can have on a child.

By explaining the negative impact, we hope to show our readers why early diagnosis is so important and why compensation may need to be sought by the child’s family, especially in cases where a doctor was negligent and failed to diagnosis the condition or made the wrong diagnosis from the start.

As you may have realized though, what makes preeclampsia such a high-risk condition is the fact that it can be fatal for both the mother and child. Although there is no cure for preeclampsia, there are treatments for many of the other health conditions that arise out of preeclampsia.

Preeclampsia can also cause a few other health complications for the mother and child including acidosis and intrauterine growth restriction, which can both negatively impact the mother and child. Acidosis is particularly problematic because it can cause the baby to lose consciousness and stop moving.

As you may have realized though, what makes preeclampsia such a high-risk condition is the fact that it can be fatal for both the mother and child. Although there is no cure for preeclampsia, there are treatments for many of the other health conditions that arise out of preeclampsia.

By delaying a diagnosis or missing the warning signs, a doctor is threatening the life of the mother and child. Many people would consider this negligent, meaning a doctor’s actions could lead to a medical malpractice lawsuit down the road, which may require the help of a skilled lawyer in order to seek compensation.

Source: The Preeclampsia Foundation, “FAQs,” Accessed Nov. 10, 2014