Surgery for Early Prostate Cancer Not Needed, Study Says

Connecticut men who have been diagnosed with early-stage prostate cancer may be interested to learn that a long-term study concluded that prostate cancer surgery does not offer any significant benefits for those who have localized tumors. In fact, those who had prostate cancer surgery were more likely to suffer complications without the benefit of living longer than those who did not have the surgery.

The study found that, for every 100 men with early-stage prostate cancer and localized tumors, only four fewer who had the surgery died when compared to those who received nonsurgical treatments. When medical complications associated with the surgery were studied, however, it was found that 30 to 40 out of 100 men who had the surgery suffered erectile dysfunction within five years of the procedure. Thirty of 100 men also experienced urinary incontinence within 10 years of the procedure.

According to the American Cancer Society, about 27,000 men die every year due to prostate cancer. However, men are increasingly being diagnosed much earlier with smaller tumors. As such, it is recommended that those who are in the early stages or who have low risk simply keep an eye on the disease and only treat when necessary. This allows those diagnosed to continue to live a better quality of life than face medical complications due to a radical, often unnecessary treatment.

Treatments and procedures that would have been given for a condition 20 years ago may not be appropriate for those same conditions now. However, this means that doctors and specialists must stay up-to-date on treatments, especially since patients rely on them to give them the best care possible. When they do not and a patient suffers a worsened medical condition, an attorney might find it advisable to file a medical malpractice lawsuit.