WHO Stresses Early Detection for Cancer

Cancer that is diagnosed too late has resulted in millions of people enduring suffering that could have been prevented and premature death. Cancer victims and survivors in Connecticut may be interested in learning that the World Health Organization wants to focus on detecting and treating the disease earlier.

According to a report released by WHO, early detection and prompt treatment are critical to the survival of people who have cervical, breast or colorectal cancers. These practices also diminish the financial impact of cancer as the cost of treatment is significantly less when the disease is in its early stages. People with cancer may also continue to work and provide financial support for their families if they are able to receive effective cancer treatments in time.

Cancer is the cause of almost one out of every six deaths in the world. In 2010, the disease was responsible for an estimated $1.16 trillion in healthcare expenses and loss of productivity. The report noted that less well-off countries experienced greater difficulties due the shortage of diagnostic services such as imaging as well as laboratory and pathology skills.

Countries are being urged to make basic, efficient and low-cost cancer diagnosis and treatment services a priority. Reducing the number of cases in which patients are required to pay for their cancer care out of their own funds, which prevent many from seeking treatment, is another important concern.

A cancer misdiagnosis may result in a worsened condition such as the spread of the disease, delayed treatment or death. Individuals whose cancer was not diagnosed properly may have cause to file malpractice suits. A medical malpractice attorney may work to hold the negligent physician who is responsible for the misdiagnosis as well as the hospital at which he or she is employed financially responsible.