Birth Injury Lawsuit Results In Settlement By Federal Government

The medical care a woman receives during a pregnancy can have major effects on the health of the woman and the child. Thus, one would hope that medical professionals would make sure to provide patients with quality care in these situations. Recently, the U.S. government settled a case involving a government medical facility that was accused of medical malpractice resulting in birth injuries.

The case involves a woman who went to a naval hospital in Virginia in 2006. The woman was allegedly 35 weeks pregnant at the time. The woman and her husband claim that when she was at the hospital, a fetal heart monitor indicated that the fetus was experiencing problems.

They then claim that despite this warning, hospital staff took over an hour to take any action regarding this development. Reportedly, doctors later concluded that a complication had resulted in the fetus being deprived of oxygen. Eventually, the woman received an emergency cesarean section.

The baby girl was allegedly born with several health complications, including neurological injuries. The child’s parents claim that these injuries will affect her for the rest of her life.

Last year, the woman and her husband brought a medical malpractice lawsuit against the U.S. government. They claimed that the government hospital’s conduct contributed to the birth injuries their child suffered. Recently, this case was settled, with the U.S. government agreeing to make a payment to the child’s parents.

This case demonstrates how important quality medical care is during a pregnancy. Errors or negligence committed by medical professionals when caring for a pregnant patient could potentially have very severe consequences. For instance, they could result in a child suffering birth injuries, as was alleged in this case. One hopes that medical facilities keep this in mind when they provide care related to a pregnancy.

Source: The Virginian-Pilot, “U.S. to pay $2.3 million to settle malpractice case,” Tim McGlone, 12 Jan 2010